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Fusible Batting Tape

 

With the economy in this terrible state, I keep looking for ways to reuse, repurpose and recycle to save money without having a negative effect on my quilting. Fusible batting tape is just what I wanted.  It helps me use what I have saving me money. Yes, I do have to buy it but the cost is less than a roll of new poly batting.

Whenever I finish a quilt, I usually have a piece of batting left over. Unfortunately, it’s usually a long skinny piece that isn’t particularly useful. I found that I could butt the edges of two pieces of batting and sew them together. While I have done this before many times, I usually put off that task as long as I can. I’m not a fan of hand basting.

This task isn’t easy to do on the sewing machine either because the fibers in the batting keep getting caught on the feed dogs. Using the sewing machine makes an obvious seam in the batting which I can feel.

I have found a much easier and faster way to put batting scraps together using   fusible batting tape which works on either cotton or poly batting.

Heat Press Batting Together and Batting Seam Tape are two brands of this handy notion that I’ve tried. There is virtually no difference in the performance of these two and both work well. I cut  the edges that I want to join so they are even, butt  the edges together, cut a piece of batting tape the appropriate length and press onto the batting covering the butt joint.

Within a couple minutes, I have a piece of batting large enough to use in a charity quilt, wall hanging, or a gift. I just sandwich the created batting between the top and the backing and quilt as usual. The sewing machine doesn’t even know that the tape is on the batting.

If you are doing hand quilting, there is virtually no bulk or resistance at the 8 to 10 stitches per inch that I do.

Since the tape is made from a very soft100% polyester tricot knit with a fusible material on one side, it is virtually undetectable in the completed quilt. I spent quite a bit of time feeling the quilt trying to detect the batting tape but all I could find was  seams in the quilt and backing.

Heat Press Batting Together comes in two widths: ¾ inch by 10 yards and 1-1/2 inches by 10 yards.  I used the wider version for my tests.

For the price of a twin batt or less, I can purchase a roll of fusible batting tape. Now I can use all my batting scraps to make my charity projects feeling even more virtuous because I’m using things that otherwise would go to waste.

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6 Responses to Fusible Batting Tape

  1. I have found you can butt two pieces of batting and zigzag it with the machine using the longest and widest zigzag stitch possible on your machine. This is quick and really does the trick. No cost at all. I’ve pieced a lot of leftover batting this way.

  2. I’ve zigzagged batting before. It just doesn’t seem as secure at the tape. I’ve also sewn it by hand. I don’t mind this when it’s only two pieces to put together.

    The tape allows me to put a lot of small pieces together. I wouldn’t use the tape if I was using very light weight, light colored fabric.

  3. Batting seam tape is the miracle product we have all been waiting for. When they say no distortion or ripples, they are telling the truth. This product will make your quilt craft budget go much further and save you money! As a longarm quilter, zig-zagged batting is one of my biggest annoyances as no matter how carefully it is stitched it leaves lumps and distortions that are “feelable” in a finished quilt. Trying to get stitched batting flat and without ripples is almost impossible and I will send pieced batting back to the owner for replacement.

  4. Batting seam tape is the miracle product we have all been waiting for. When they say no distortion or ripples, they are telling the truth. This product will make your quilt craft budget go much further and save you money! As a longarm quilter, zig-zagged batting is one of my biggest annoyances as no matter how carefully it is stitched it leaves lumps and distortions that are “feelable” in a finished quilt. Trying to get stitched batting flat and without ripples is almost impossible and I will send machine pieced batting back to the owner for replacement.

  5. I have a lot of small pieces of batting left over from various quilting projects over the years. I had been hanging onto them for smaller quilts but they were never the right size. Now I’ve started using up all of those batting scraps with the Batting Seam Tape I found at threads-unlimited.com for a pretty reasonable price.

  6. exellent!

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